The Living Bread

Nativity

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In Bethlehem was born the One who, under the sign of broken bread, would leave us the memorial of his Pasch. On this Holy Night [Christmas], adoration of the Child Jesus becomes Eucharistic adoration. We adore you, Lord, truly present in the Sacrament of the Altar, the living Bread which gives life to humanity. We acknowledge you as our one God, a little Child lying helpless in the manger!

 St. John Paul II

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Wherever We Go

Solanus Casey

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“What does it matter where we go? Wherever we go, won’t we be serving God there? And wherever we go, won’t we have Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament with us? Isn’t that enough to make us happy?”

 Blessed Father Solanus Casey

What Shall I Answer?

Sacred Heart (6)

“What shall I answer if I have not responded to the love of Jesus – and not given Him the whole love of my heart – and not spent myself for Him Who loved me unto death, even unto the death of the Cross? What shall I answer when  I find out that throughout my life, every hour of the day and night, Jesus was for me imprisoned in the tabernacle, pleading for me with the Father – wishing for me to visit Him, to unite Himself to me, and to be my faithful, my own God?”

(From Meditation on the Passion by A Mistress of Novices of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin  Mary )

Come Here!

monstrance_holding_Christ_in_the_Eucharist_during_adoration

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“Let weak and frail men come here in humble entreaty to adore the Sacrament of Christ, not to discuss high things, or to wish to penetrate difficulties, but  to bow down to secret things in humble veneration, and to abandon God’s mysteries to God, for Truth deceives no man – Almighty God can do all things.”

(St. Paul of the Cross from Manual of Eucharistic Adoration)

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Our Life-Long Guest

“Just as He stood quietly among His apostles . . . so does He abide with us in the Blessed Sacrament, that we may get to know Him, to outlive our tremulous agitation, and the novelty of our surprise, and to grow familiar with Him, if we can, as our life-long Guest. There we can bring our sorrows and cares and necessities at all hours . . .

tabernacle-with-crucifix

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We can choose our own time, and our visit can be as short or as long as duties permit or as love desires. There is an unction and a power in the mere silent companionship of the Blessed Sacrament which is beyond all words . . . .

The ways of visiting the Blessed Sacrament must be as various as the souls of men. Some love to go there to listen; some to speak; some to confess to Him as if He were their priest; some to examine their consciences; as before their judge; some to do homage as to their king; some to study Him as their Doctor and Prophet: some to find shelter as with their Creator. Some rejoice in His Divinity, others in His Sacred Humanity, others in the mysteries of the season.

Some visit Him on different days by His different titles, as God, Father, Brother, Shepherd, Head of the Church, and the like. Some visit to adore, some to intercede, some to petition, some to return thanks, some to get consolation; but all visit Him to love and, to all who visit Him in love, He is a power of heavenly grace and a fountain of many goods, no single one of which the whole created universe could either merit or confer.”

(Father Frederick William Faber from The Blessed Sacrament: The Works and Ways of God).