A Forgotten Truth – Sacrilegious Communions Offend Our Lord

Judas' Kiss

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

“…in Judas, the Divine Savior saw not only the Iscariot, the apostle of Jewish nationality, but likewise the coming legion of traitorous souls. In the traitor’s kiss, He felt the outrage of so many sacrilegious Communions.”

(Father Jose Guadalupe Trevino from The Holy Eucharist)

 

Lasting Embrace

Jesus embracing St. Bernard

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

“Come to the foot of my tabernacle and, far from the impure and degraded world, breathe in an atmosphere of purity. Come and eat My Body and drink My Blood, and I shall live within your heart, and My arms shall enfold you in an embrace which it depends on your free will to make last till the eternal embrace in heaven.”

(From The Holy Eucharist by Father Jose Guadalupe Trevino)

Rossi’s mean remarks

In the Light of the Law

Civil lawyer C. T. Rossi, in his essay Permission for Divorce and the Catholic Lawyer’s Dilemma, complains that “the Church has done little to educate its legal practitioners about their responsibilities as Catholic lawyers”, complains that it is sometimes difficult for attorneys to know whether it is “morally safe for them to assist a potential client”, and complains about prelates “who refuse to lift a finger to assist in the moral burdens that American Catholic lawyers face every day.”

My initial reaction to Rossi’s litany of woes, however, (something akin to “Okay. So, deal with it.”), is insufficient given that, not only does Rossi aim these complaints-qua-accusations at “the Church” herself, but he manages to mangle nearly every point he addresses and, in regard to the Jesuit Felix Cappello, he truly, truly, embarrasses himself. Where to begin?

How about with the canard that “the Church has done…

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Bp. McGrath’s letter on sacramental service

In the Light of the Law

In 1977, during the darkest period of canonical confusion that ran from the end of the Second Vatican Council until the promulgation of the 1983 Code, then-Fr Patrick McGrath earned a doctoral degree in canon law from the Lateran University in Rome. Now-Bp Patrick McGrath of San Jose is surely aware, then, that multiple canonical requirements for sacramental participation exist and he would, I imagine, be distressed to learn that his recent letter, implying that “good faith” is the only criterion for admission to the sacraments, could be pastorally misleading.

A key—not the only, but a key—norm controlling the administration of sacraments to the faithful is Canon 843 § 1 which states: “Sacred ministers cannot deny the sacraments to those who seek them at appropriate times, are properly disposed, and are not prohibited by law from receiving them.” Phrased negatively (because, given the fundamental right of the faithful to…

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We Have Such Little Generosity

A word that ought to cover many a Catholic with shame and confusion once came from the lips of a person raised in Protestant tenets and surroundings:

Sanctuary

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

“If I believed in the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, I should spend all my life before a tabernacle, and no power could tear me away from it.”

Does this not suffice to put to shame our little generosity in visiting Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament

(From The Holy Eucharist by Father Jose Guadalupe Trevino)?